the cardigan librarian

Apr 22

Advise me: Summer Reading Prizes for YAs

Last year I got a pretty good stash of ARCs, comic books, rock gym memberships, burrito gift cards and movie vouchers donated. I’ve got the funds to do a bit of shopping this year, though.

What’s your strategy? Or are you against incentivizing reading?

Apr 06

themugglelibrarian:

schoollibraryjournal:

School librarian, media specialist, teacher librarian… What do you go by?

Media specialist seems to be most common around here, but I tend to prefer (aspiring) school librarian.

I like “teen librarian” but my actual title is “Head of Young Adult Services” which sounds grander and stuffier than my actual gig. “Tween and teen librarian” is probably most accurate, since fifth through seventh graders are kinda my bread and butter.

themugglelibrarian:

schoollibraryjournal:

School librarian, media specialist, teacher librarian… What do you go by?

Media specialist seems to be most common around here, but I tend to prefer (aspiring) school librarian.

I like “teen librarian” but my actual title is “Head of Young Adult Services” which sounds grander and stuffier than my actual gig. “Tween and teen librarian” is probably most accurate, since fifth through seventh graders are kinda my bread and butter.

YA Review: The Ring and the Crown, Melissa de la Cruz

Princess Marie-Victoria, heir to the vast Franco-British Empire, lives in a world where magic fizzes just below the surfaces. But what’s the good of wealth and privilege if you can’t be with the one you love? During one fateful London season, Marie and a host of other young people gathered in the great city will struggle to follow their hearts or their destinies.

I came for the alternate history and stayed to see the tangled love stories play out. I liked the historical imagining but the language often felt stilted and the characterization weak (especially the Merlin and the Queen). I liked the somewhat old-fashioned morality of the ending but thought some of it felt rushed and unearned.

Verdict: I’ll order a copy for my YA collection, but I don’t think I’d read a sequel myself.

(Full disclosure: I received an e-ARC from Netgalley in exchange for my honest review.)

Mar 21

Either he knows that real Abnegation don’t take selfies, or else he’s a true Dauntless at heart like his papa.
(Getting ready for the Tween & Teen Dauntless Movie Release Party tonight!)

Either he knows that real Abnegation don’t take selfies, or else he’s a true Dauntless at heart like his papa.

(Getting ready for the Tween & Teen Dauntless Movie Release Party tonight!)

Mar 17

nprbooks:

The disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in November 1961 was an international incident: Rockeller, the 23-year-old scion of one of the world’s richest families, had gone to New Guinea to collect native art for his father’s newly founded Museum of Primitive Art in New York. And then, he vanished.
His fate was an unsolved mystery — until now. Carl Hoffman has spent years tracking the story, searching documents and living amongst the Asmat, a Stone Age people known for their cannibalism as well as their beautiful carving skills. His new book is Savage Harvest: A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism and Michael Rockefeller’s Tragic Quest for Primitive Art.
Check out Hoffman’s interview with NPR’s Jacki Lyden.

Officially added to my to be read list. I love me some armchair tourism. (Especially when the term is very loosely applied to places I would NEVER ACTUALLY WANT TO VISIT.)

nprbooks:

The disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in November 1961 was an international incident: Rockeller, the 23-year-old scion of one of the world’s richest families, had gone to New Guinea to collect native art for his father’s newly founded Museum of Primitive Art in New York. And then, he vanished.

His fate was an unsolved mystery — until now. Carl Hoffman has spent years tracking the story, searching documents and living amongst the Asmat, a Stone Age people known for their cannibalism as well as their beautiful carving skills. His new book is Savage Harvest: A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism and Michael Rockefeller’s Tragic Quest for Primitive Art.

Check out Hoffman’s interview with NPR’s Jacki Lyden.

Officially added to my to be read list. I love me some armchair tourism. (Especially when the term is very loosely applied to places I would NEVER ACTUALLY WANT TO VISIT.)

Mar 13

Get To Know Your Tumblarians Tuesday: How did you find the tumblarian community? -

lecieltumultueux:

Today’s excellent question comes to us from funambulizm! Some of us have been posting or lurking in the tumblarian community for a while, but there are lots of newcomers thanks to webinars/conferences/tagging/libraries being awesome.

This raises a good question, because…

I also got started ages ago (I’ve been on tumblr with my personal account since 2007), when I was trying to step it up professionally. It was pre-#tumblarians but then I got selfishly pregnant and all that snoozing and puking cut into my tumblin’ time.

Mar 08

jonklassen2:

Leo Lionni


My first library gig, my most memorable task was making a felt storyboard of Fish Is Fish. I wonder if it’s still getting used a decade later back at LeRoy Collins…

jonklassen2:

Leo Lionni

My first library gig, my most memorable task was making a felt storyboard of Fish Is Fish. I wonder if it’s still getting used a decade later back at LeRoy Collins…

(via abcofreading)

Feb 28

mmimic asked: Hello! Do you know if any of our tumblarians are children's/youth services librarians? Thank you!

brownsharpie:

historyhobbit:

bkmuse7:

notyourstereotypicallibrarian:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Raise your hand for mmimic if you work with the childrenz!

waves hand wildly in the air« Ooo!! Oooo!!! Me!! I do!! Meeee!!!! :)

*puts hands in the air like I just don’t care*

me too!

I just made my raised hand into a puppet—and began talking to it. Does that answer your question?

Paint covered hands are raised!

Ages ten and up over here.

Feb 26

Introducing RA Unconference! -

raunconference:

Librarians with a particular interest in readers’ advisory are cordially invited to join a group of like-minded folk at Darien Library on Friday, May 16, 2014, for the Library’s first annual RA Unconference. Or, as we’ve been calling it, RAUNCON. (Pronounced RON-CON.) Darien…

Intrigued. And it’s not a long hike from where I’m sitting.

Feb 24

Where do books go when they die? -

catalogingandcardigans:

lecieltumultueux:

swhisted:

Blogging about my experience with library donations…

Yesterday I was dropping off some books for donation and happened to notice one of their book sales actually going on so I checked it out. I walked into a room with rows and rows of books and my heart sank. Paperbacks went for $.25, hardbacks…

Just a few different things to consider:

1. Some libraries buy multiple copies of bestsellers so patrons don’t sit on a wait list for months to read that new James Patterson. Eventually, the list dies down and that shelf space could go to new materials. This means the books have to be pulled!

2. Some libraries sell their discarded books at sales. This is great for community members, as well as organizations that need resources at a low price. Some teachers just don’t have the funds to collect books for their classrooms and they can get a bunch for a low price at these sales. 

3. Some libraries throw out their discards. This might seem scary, but there are policies being followed. Books that are moldy need to go in the dumpster! They can spread to other books and ruin them. Other books might look brand new, like travel guides, but no one is going to benefit from a 2006 travel guide to Cancun. Most of the information will be inaccurate. Other books might look brand new because no one has ever checked them out! Librarians check stats to see how often the book has gone out. A book that has circulated only once in 10 years could be hogging valuable shelf space for a better used book, or space that might go to an extra computer for community members to use!

4. Some libraries send their books to organizations like Better World Books, where they can resell decent quality books and use some of the profits to donate books to literacy programs. However, sending books out-of-house to companies or charities requires extra staff time and sometimes money.

The bottom line is it varies from library to library, and the librarians are following a plan. I PROMISE. Even if you see books in a dumpster, lots of thought has gone into that decision. They’re doing this to benefit the people who use the library. I’m sure your library would be happy to explain their weeding policy to you!

The above answer about weeding is perfect, so I won’t go on about why weeding is important. What struck me more was the OP’s refusal to buy cheap books because she believed they were worth more. That is silly. A book’s value is not determined by how much the publisher decides to charge for it. Nor are books sacred objects. This is why I destroy them sometimes. By passing those books up, you’re demonstrating the same behavior that got those books in the sale in the first place. Libraries do not have the time/space/money to save books that no one wants. 

I’m a big believer in aggressive weeding and discarding after I saw some of the donated titles imported at great cost to rural libraries in Uganda. Obsolete computer manuals. American textbooks (that fail to consider standardized and Anglicized national curriculum in Uganda). Impenetrable classics.

I’m a librarian. I love finding homes for books. But some books are ready for retirement.

(Source: sarahwhisted.com)